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NEW 28 FEB. 2013

Q: WHY DO MEN'S CLOTHES HAVE BUTTONS ON THE RIGHT WHILE WOMEN'S
CLOTHES HAVE BUTTONS ON THE LEFT?

A: WHEN BUTTONS WERE INVENTED, THEY WERE VERY EXPENSIVE AND WORN PRIMARILY BY THE RICH.
SINCE MOST PEOPLE ARE RIGHT-HANDED, IT IS EASIER TO PUSH BUTTON ON THE RIGHT THROUGH HOLES
ON THE LEFT. BECAUSE WEALTHY WOMEN WERE DRESSED BY MAIDS, DRESSMAKERS PU THE
BUTTONS ON THE MAID'S RIGHT! AND THAT'S WHERE WOMEN'S BUTTON HAVE REMAINED SINCE

Q: WHY DO X'S AT THE END OF A LETTER SIGNIFY KISSES?

A: IN THE MIDDLE AGES, WHEN MANY PEOPLE WERE UNABLE TO READ OR WRITE, DOCUMENTS WERE
OFTEN SIGNED USING AN X. KISSING THE X REPRESENTED AN OATH TO FULFILL OBLIGATIONS
SPECIFIED IN THE DOCUMENT. THE X AND THE KISS EVENTUALLY BECAME SYNONYMOUS.

Q: WHY ARE PEOPLE IN THE PUBLIC EYE SAID TO BE "IN THE LIMELIGHT"?

A: INVENTED IN 1825, LIMELIGHT WAS USED IN LIGHTHOUSES AND THEATRES BY BURNING
A CYLINDER OF LIME WHICH PRODUCED A BRILLIANT LIGHT. IN THE THEATRE, A PERFORMER
"IN THE LIMELIGHT" WAS THE CENTRE OF ATTENTION.

Legends, Lies & Cherished Myths of American History
by Richard Shenkman.

Uncle Sam was real too. His name was Sam Wilson (who was one of Johnny
Appleseed's boyhood friends.) He did not wear striped pants and did not have
a long white beard, but he did wear a top hat. Wilson's nick name was Uncle
Sam. During the War of 1812 when Wilson began supplying meat to troops
stationed around Troy, New York the meat was stamped "U.S." for United
States. An imaginative worker in Wilson's store told a government inspector
that the initials stood for "Uncle Sam". Soon all federal supplies were
said to belong to "Uncle Sam".


Legends, Lies & Cherished Myths of American History
by Richard Shenkman.

John Chapman, AKA Johnny Appleseed, not only lived, he really did tramp
through the Ohio Valley planting trees. Johnny was a well-liked nursery man
who kept moving his nurseries west to keep abreast of the receding frontier.
He may very well have liked to walk barefoot, but the fact is he probably
didn't need to; he was so successful that by the end of his life he had
accumulated more than 1200 acres of land.


Handshaking has a long and "shaky" history.
Scholars say the first shake on record occurred after the Battle of Hastings in 1066.
Then warriors grasped each other's forearms as a gester of peace and to check for weapons
In the 16th and 17th centuries and in the beginnings of the 18th century the handshake was
not used as a greeting. It served to seal the peace between two parties or as a contract
for closing business deals. Even a warring husband and wife would settle their dispute
with a handshake.
The Quakers are believed to be the first to popularize the handshake as a greeting.
A group known for its rejection of worldly vanity, the Quakers favored the egalitarian
(promoting equality) handshake to grander gestures of the day such as bowing, hand
kissing and sweeping one's hat.


It is well to be alert for occupations being capitalized identification following
a name without a comma. Very few people in the colonial period had three names.
John William Carpenter in 1785 was probably John Williams, carpenter
John Henry Taylor may well have been John Henry, tailor. Some wills and deeds
have been found to have been indexed by occupation, not the name.


Railroaders got into a rate war in the 1880's and the price of a ticket
from Kansas City to Los Angeles dropped to $1.00. It's an historical
fact that a lot of people wound up in Los Angeles merely because it was
a cheap ride.


From the book Extraordinary Orgins of Everyday things
by Charles Panati:

Ring-a-ring o-roses
A pocket full of posies
A-tishoo! A-tishoo!
We all fall down.

The rhyme first appeared in an 1881 book, Mother Goose, though in oral
tradition it is MUCH older. It is about the Great Plague of London in
1664-65.
In the rhyme, "ring - o - roses" refers to the circular rosy rash that was
one of the early symptoms of the plague. The phrase "pockets, full of posies
stands for the herbs people carried in their pockets, hoping for protection
against the disease. "A-tishoo! A-tishoo! / We all fall down." tell of the
plagues fatal sneeze, which preceded physical collapse; literaly, the
victim fell down dead.


Records of this major epidemic, which occurred in the sixth century
A.D., indicate that over 100 million people were killed by this plague
within a 50-year period.

In the fourteenth century the "Black Death" claimed the lives of at
least a quarter of all Europeans.


U.S. News & World Report

A favorite of the English since the days
when Henry VIII aimed for the bull's-eye,
darts has recently blossomed into a pastime
of choice among Americans. According to the
National Sporting Goods Association, the
number of American darters more than doubled
between 1985 and 1995, to almost 20 million,
putting darts ahead of tennis, baseball,
and soccer in popularity.

If your ancestor went to sea in the 1800s, he may have applied
for a Seaman's Protection Certificate to protect him from
imprisonment by Great Britain and other powers. This program
lasted from 1796-1897. The applicant presented proof of
citizenship and paid a fee of 25 cents. Every three months a list
of seamen was sent to the Secretary of State, Washington, D.C.
stating each seaman's age and physical description. Write the
Archives Division, National Archives & Records, Washington,
D.C. 20408.


Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things
Charles Panati

The words "Mary had a little lamb,' were the first words of recorded
speech. Thomas Edison spoke these words into his newest inventions, the
phonograph on November 20, 1877

This rhyme was written by Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale of Boston, editor of the
widely read Ladies Magazine. She was also the editor of Juvenile Miscellany.
When she was told of a true story, which a pet lamb followed its young
owner into a country schoolhouse, she composed the rhyme and published it in
September-October 1830 issue of the children's magazine. It is regarded as
the best four lines of verse in the English language.


January - Cold Moon
February - Hunger Moon
March - Crow Moon
April - Grass Moon
May - Planting Moon
June - Rose Moon
July - Thunder Moon
August - Green Corn Moon
September - Harvest Moon
October - Hunting Moon
November - Frosty Moon
December - Long-night Moon


From the book Extraordinary Origins of Everyday things
by Charles Panati:

Sing a song of six pence,
A pocket fill of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds,
Baked in a pie.

A sixteenth-century Italian cookbook "The Manner of Cuisine of What Meat For
What Affair", offers a recipe for actually baking live birds between crusts
of a pie. If the instructions are followed, the book promised, "the birds
may be alive and flie out when it is cut up." The purpose of such a pie was
to create a "diverting Hurley-Burley amongst the Guest.
"

Did you know that the word inmate in old papers may
refer to a person living in the home of another
person, not necessarily an institution? Freeman is a
designation once used to mean an unmarried man.
Domestic once meant a housewife, not necessarily
a servant. Housekeeper would mean a property owner,
male or female. Mrs. or Mistress with a woman's
name usually meant she was a wealthy woman, and
that was the proper way to address her. Mr. or Mister
was used only for a man of wealth, or one who was
educated. A retired man might have been referred
to as a gentleman.

Probably the least used resource of all are the Orphan's Courts
found in many states. These courts do not deal only with small
children without parents, but also handle a variety of records
which can be most profitable. First we must understand that
the legal definition of an orphan is one who lost his natural
father. It is not tied to the mother or to any specific age.
Orphan court records, called "dockets," are used to appoint
or change appointments of guradians for orphans, incompetents,
and sometimes indigents. They also record administrators for
estates and frequently trustees. Many property transfers,
inventories of estates, marriages, births, and deaths are to
be found in these "Orphan Court Dockets." You might even uncover
and elusive maiden name for when a widow asks that an individual
be appointed guardian for her son; it's possible that they
are related.

About one hundred years ago, it is estimated that about 87%
of adult males belonged to some fraternal organization, such
as Freemasons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pithias, Elks, Moose,
and Owls, for example. The reason these organizations were so
popular is that they were something of an insurance policy as
they all had an obligation to take care of widows and orphans
of their members.


Surname Links

Bingham Finney Mahoney Puckett Wood
Bowman Ford Martin Renshaw
Bradshaw Fuller McEvers Rosbrugh
Burt Hayes Millman Shafer Shaw
Cartwright Hays Montgomery Smith
Chandler Ingalls Mooar Sprecher
Chapman Isaacs Osgood Steele
Corbett Cunningham Johnson Peake Sudlow
Dane Knapp Phillips Tripp Tuft
Evans Lowery Poore Wardwell


MORE GENEALOGY FUN FACTS

Census Takers-True Story (GSNOCC)
Faded Writing
3 Cent Silver Coins
Ancestors Arivals (GSNOCC)

ISAACS GENELAOGY by Janice Allen Faulconer

Andover, Ma. Andover, MA. Genealogy

Brawley Calif Rail and Quad riding

Germany Pre WWII Dresden Figurines

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